Introduction

Hello, thank you for joining me along my journey of becoming a Runner! I've always been an active guy, played sports in high school and continued into adult recreation sports after high school. As I started my family and found a career, the activity level slowly decreased. Well my Fiance had enough of our lazy ways and started on the Weight Watchers program and completely overhauled our daily meals. Step 2 was getting more active, so we decided to JOG our annual Juvenile Diabetes charity walk and actually enjoyed the activity. The month following the charity walk, we signed up for our first official 5K and had an absolute blast. From that point forward I have officially been BIT by the running bug and this is my journey to becoming a RUNNER!

Thursday, February 27, 2014

Noticable Difference

I've been trying to stay consistent with my trail runs on my lunch break.  Yesterday I ran farther along the trail which means I am getting quicker up the mountain in the same amount of time.  Granted I am still a long way from reaching the summit lol. 

The noticable difference came in my evening run.  The uphill trail work is really doing wonders for my stamina.  Last evening Buster and I set out to knock out a few miles and I started to feel pretty good so we ended up running 4 miles at about 9 min pace.  Since my ITB injuries I have been mixing in running and walking to minimize the pounding on my knees.  I am happy to say that I actually ran all four miles last night.  As we passed the second mile I noticed that my legs were clearly tired, which is why my times were a bit slower, but that I was not running out of breath as easily.  I started using the trail runs as an opporunity to log more miles throughout my week, but with this added stamina, I could see myself continuing these uphill runs moving forward.

Do you do any hill work?  What type of elevation climb do you add into your runs?

May skip the trail run today to rest my legs, then run a few recovery miles tonight.

6 comments:

  1. That's awesome! Love seeing progress!

    The biggest hill we have here in Fort Lauderdale is a speed bump, so I don't do any hill work at all. I do have a bridge on my normal loop that I usually walk, but I am planning to start running it ... and maybe doing some hill repeats on it. I saw a guy doing them yesterday and it simultaneously looked painful and badass!

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    1. Yeah these trail runs burn my legs and my lungs pretty bad but if I keep having this type of progress, I'll deal with those pains lol.

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  2. I add hill work in, weather permitting. I think it helps with stamina, and the mental game. I do a "Fast hike up a 1178 ft. hill. It's 5 miles total, maybe 1 trail relatively flat, 2 uphill, 2 down (I walk down for safety). I use the Strava app on my phone to record it and post, and you can "race" other people's times for the trail or segments of it and get "King of the Mountains"...I was adding it to my workout in the fall and it was fun to compete with others...Check out the Strava app, I am sure they use it on the trails you run on too. I am looking forward to hitting the trails again, when the snow clears. It will probably be a while...Enjoy the trails!

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    1. Yeah the hill I am running goes up about 1300 ft in about 2 miles with some pretty technical sections. The uphill burns so I dont enjoy it as much, but I love the downhill, really challenging when your running down.

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  3. I have some hilly routes I run here, but the biggest elevation is usually about 175 ft. I do think it you can power up hills it's a benefit. I need to start working hill repeats! Trails are easier on the pounding.

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  4. I think any hill work helps. You use different muscles when you are powering uphill than when you are on a flat track.

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